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Abstract #1074

Six month clinical outcomes following pulmonary contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the primary workup of pulmonary embolism

Mark L. Schiebler1, Michael D. Repplinger2, Christopher Lindholm3, John Harringa2, Christopher J. Fran├žois1, Karl K. Vigen1, Azita G. Hamedani2, Thomas M. Grist1,4,5, Scott B. Reeder1,2,4,6, and Scott K. Nagle1,5,7

1Radiology, UW-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 2Emergency Medicine, UW-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 3UW Madison School of Medicine, UW-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 4Biomedical Engineering, UW-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 5Medical Physics, UW-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 6Medicine, UW-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 7Pediatrics, UW-Madison, Madison, WI, United States

The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography (PE-MRA) for the primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of 675 consecutive patients who underwent PE-MRA. Adverse events (venous thromboembolism (VTE), bleeding or death) that were potentially related either to over or under treatment of PE during the subsequent 6 months were extracted from the electronic medical record. The negative predictive value for this test was found to be 97%. Based upon these outcomes, PE-MRA performs similarly to CTA as a primary test to exclude clinically significant pulmonary embolism in patients presenting acutely with dyspnea.

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