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Abstract #2826

INCREASED PREVALENCE OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT ANATOMY AMONG ATHLETES WHO TREAD WATER 

Joanna Lind Langner1, Marianne Black1, James MacKay2, Kimberly Hall3, Marc Safran3, Feliks Kogan1, and Garry Gold1
1Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States, 2Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 3Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a disorder that causes hip pain and disability in young patients, particularly athletes. Treading water leads to increased stress on the hip, the effects of which are poorly understood. In this study, we used MRI to identify the prevalence of FAI anatomy in elite aquatic athletes that tread water. The prevalence of cam FAI was higher than that previously reported for any other sport. This study demonstrates that synchronized swimmers and water polo athletes are at increased risk of cam FAI, more than other sports.

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