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Abstract #4530

Topological alterations in structural brain connectivity networks are associated with survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Timo Roine1,2, Oskari Kantonen3, Ulrika Roine1, Sami Virtanen4, Jani Saunavaara4,5, Riitta Parkkola4, Ruut Laitio6, Olli Arola6, Marja Hynninen7, Juha Martola8, Heli M Silvennoinen8, Marjaana Tiainen9, Risto O. Roine10, Harry Scheinin6, and Timo Laitio6
1Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, Aalto University School of Science, Espoo, Finland, 2Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland, 3Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and the Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland, 4Department of Radiology, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland, 5Department of Medical Physics, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland, 6Division of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland, 7Division of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, 8Department of Radiology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, 9Department of Neurology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, 10Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland

Mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is high, and there is a substantial need for new biomarkers to improve the identification of patients with poor outcome. Therefore, we investigated structural brain connectivity networks in patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in order to detect differences related to survival. We found decreased global efficiency and strength from MRI scans acquired in a median of 53 hours (IQR 47-64) after OHCA to be related to mortality at 6 months after OHCA. In addition, several regions with decreased strength and local efficiency were found, most significantly in the pallidum, and superior frontal and supramarginal cortices.

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