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Abstract #0055

On the Potential of Whole-Brain Postmortem MR Imaging at 3T: New Insights into Multiple Sclerosis with Resolutions Up to 200μm

Matthias Weigel1,2,3, Peter Dechent4, Riccardo Galbusera1,2, Rene Mueller5, Govind Nair6, Ludwig Kappos2, Wolfgang Brück5, and Cristina Granziera1,2
1Translational Imaging in Neurology (ThINk) Basel, Department of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, 2Neurologic Clinic and Policlinic, Departments of Medicine, Clinical Research and Biomedical Engineering, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, 3Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland, 4Department of Cognitive Neurology, MR-Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany, 5Institute of Neuropathology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany, 6Translational Neuroradiology Section, Division of Neuroimmunology and Neurovirology, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States

MR imaging is an indispensable tool for the depiction of human brain anatomy and pathology. Besides in vivo acquisitions, MRI of the fixated human brain is highly interesting: Very long scan times basically allow unprecedented MRI resolutions on clinical scanners. The present work describes an MRI approach that was developed for standard clinical 3T systems and tests for the viable boundaries: Within scan times between a few hours up to a weekend, acquisitions of high soft tissue contrast with isotropic resolutions up to 200μm can be achieved; revealing fine structure details and allowing an impressing lesion detection and characterization.

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