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Abstract #0088

A first-in-child feasibility study of a new mini-capsule medical device to measure whole gut transit in pediatric constipation using MRI (MAGIC)

Hayfa Sharif1,2, Nichola Abrehart1, Caroline Hoad1,3, Kathryn Murray1,3, Alan Perkins1,4, Penny Gowland3, Robin Spiller1, Roy Harris1, Sian Kirkham5, Sabarinathan Loganathan5, Michalis Papadopoulos5, the Young Persons Advisory Group (YPAG)6, David Devadason5, and Luca Marciani1
1Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre and NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 2Clinical Radiology, Amiri Hospital, Ministry Of Health, Civil Service Commission, Kuwait, 3Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 4Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 5Nottingham Children’s Hospital, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 6NUH YPAG, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, United Kingdom

We developed a new MRI mini-capsule marker device to measure whole gut transit (WGTT) in pediatric constipation to overcome image quality and ionizing radiation limitations of current X-ray methods. Thirty five healthy children and 16 patients with constipation were asked to swallow a number of mini-capsules and imaged, following a common X-ray radiopaque marker protocol. The capsules were imaged successfully in the colon. WGTT was calculated from the capsules count and was significantly longer in the patients compared to the controls. The study also showed excellent feasibility and safety of using the new device and methods in children with constipation.

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