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Abstract #0098

Automatic detection and reacquisition of motion degraded images in fetal HASTE imaging at 3T

Borjan Gagoski1,2, Junshen Xu3, Paul Wighton4, Dylan Tisdall5, Robert Frost2,4, Sayeri Lala6, Wei-Ching Lo7, Polina Golland8,9, Andre van der Kouwe2,4, Elfar Adalsteinsson8,10, and P. Ellen Grant1,2
1Fetal Neonatal Neuroimaging and Developmental Science Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States, 2Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States, 3(co-first author) Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States, 4Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States, 5Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 6Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, United States, 7Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, Charlestown, MA, United States, 8Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States, 9Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States, 10Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States

Fetal brain MRI suffers from unpredictable and unconstrained fetal motion that not only causes severe image artifacts even with single-shot FSE readouts, but also results in slice-to-slice variations of the imaging plane and long scanning sessions, as the MR technologist “chases” the fetal head in an attempt to acquire artifact-free orthogonal images. In this work, we have implemented a closed-loop pipeline that automatically detects and reacquires HASTE images that were degraded by fetal motion, without any interaction from the MRI technologist. The presented methods demonstrate the basic infrastructure needed for successful prospective automated fetal brain motion correction.

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