Meeting Banner
Abstract #0700

Investigation of Dormant and Metastatic Breast Cancer Metabolism via Hyperpolarized 13C-MRS and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

Paul Begovatz1, Sarah Erickson-Bhatt2,3,4, Benjamin Cox2, Suzanne Ponik4, Kevin Eliceiri1,2,3, and Sean Fain1,5,6
1Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 2Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison, WI, United States, 3Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 4Cell and Regenerative Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 5Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 6Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States

Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-MRS) and NADH fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) have evolved as methods to detect metabolic shifts in aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation which are associated with metastatic potential in cancer metabolism. This study set out to investigate the differences in cancer metabolism between murine non-metastatic, metastatic-dormant, and highly metastatic breast cancer cell lines. FLIM analysis revealed no differences in free and bound NADH between cell lines, indicative of uniform ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation; however, hyperpolarized 13C-MRS measurements detected an increase in lactate production, or aerobic glycolysis, which was associated with greater breast cancer metastatic potential.

This abstract and the presentation materials are available to 2020 meeting attendees and eLibrary customers only; a login is required.

Join Here