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Abstract #1071

Effect of subject-specific labelling efficiency for arterial spin labelling on cerebral blood flow in mild stroke patients

Michael S Stringer1,2, Nithya N Nair3, Una Clancy1,2, Alasadir Morgan1,2, Zahra Shirzadi4,5, Yulu Shi1,2,6, Francesca Chappell1,2, Antoine Vallatos1,2, Maria Valdes Hernandez1,2, Dany Jaime Garcia1,2, Gordon W Blair1,2, Rosalind Brown1,2, Bradley J MacIntosh4,5, Ian Marshall1,2, Fergus Doubal1,2, Michael J Thrippleton1,2, and Joanna M Wardlaw1,2
1Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 2UK DRI at the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 3Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 4Department of Biomedical Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, 5Hurvitz Brain Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, 6Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

Accurate cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification using arterial spin labelling (ASL) depends on physiological and MR parameters. Labelling efficiency is particularly relevant given it may vary between vascular disease patients. We determined subject-specific labelling efficiency values using phase-contrast MRI scans in a mild stroke cohort. Bland-Altman plots suggested a bias in CBF, with nominal labelling efficiency values underestimating at low and overestimating at high CBF. Using subject-specific, but not nominal, labelling efficiency showed plausible associations between white matter CBF and smoking status, pulse pressure, and age. Subject-specific labelling efficiencies appear to mitigate variance and improve CBF quantification in clinical ASL.

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