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Abstract #1362

Locus Coeruleus derived norepinephrine alters intrinsic functional connectivity at the Default-Mode Network

Li-Ming Hsu1,2,3,4, Esteban Oyarzabal1,3,4, Manasmita Das1,3,4, Tzu-Hao Harry Chao1,3,4, Sheng Song1,3,4, Yu-Wei Chen5, Dinggang Shen2, Sungho Lee1,3,4, Patricia Jensen6, and Yen-Yu Ian Shih1,3,4
1Neurology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, 2Radiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, 3Biomedical Imaging Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, 4Center for Animal MRI, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States, 5Developmental Neurobiology, NIEHS/NIH, RDU, NC, United States, 6Developmental Neurobiology, NIH/NIEHS, RDU, NC, United States

Norepinephrine (NE) is suspected to rapidly modulate strength and structure of intrinsic functional connectivity (FC). We used chemogenetic fMRI to selectively isolate the role of NE Locus Coeruleus (LC) neurons, compared to NE A1/A2/A4 neurons, on FC modulation. Among 19 parcellated FC modules, NE-LC neurons significantly enhanced ReHo, ALFF and DC within the anterior Default-Mode, Motor and Somatosensory modules and enhanced FC strength within and between Default-Mode modules. Dynamic FC analysis found Default-Mode differences were attributed to two co-activation patterns (CAPs) associated with Default-Mode suppression that explains the ability of NE to focus wandering minds into sensory attention.

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