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Abstract #1784

Development of an unbiased population-specific brain atlas for adolescent collision-sport athletes  

Yukai Zou1,2, Wenbin Zhu3, Ho-Ching (Shawn) Yang1, Nicole L Vike4, Diana O Svaldi1, Trey E Shenk5, Victoria N Poole1,4, Gregory G Tamer, Jr.1, Larry J Leverenz6, Ulrike Dydak7, Eric A Nauman1,4,8, Thomas M Talavage1,5, and Joseph V Rispoli1,5
1Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States, 2College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States, 3Department of Statistics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States, 4Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States, 5School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States, 6Department of Health and Kinesiology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States, 7School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States, 8School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States

Over years of practices and competitions, adolescent collision-sport (American football, soccer) athletes undergo repetitive subconcussive head impacts, and therefore may exhibit a neuroanatomical trajectory different from healthy adolescents in general. Targeting this vulnerable population, we constructed a specific brain atlas that includes templates (T1 and DTI) and semantic labels (cortical and white matter parcellations), and we demonstrated that the unbiased population-specific brain atlas can minimize bias introduced in spatial normalization, improve sensitivity of voxel-wise statistical analysis, and therefore better clarify the mechanisms that lead to traumatic brain injury in adolescent athletes.

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