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Abstract #1785

Metabolite activity in the anterior cingulate cortex during a painful stimulus using functional MRS

Jessica Archibald1,2, Erin L MacMillan3,4,5, Carina Graf2,6, Piotr Kozlowski2,7,8, Cornelia Laule2,9,10, and John LK Kramer1,2,11
1Experimental Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 2International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), Vancouver, BC, Canada, 3Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 4Image Tech Lab, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 5Philips Healthcare Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 6Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 7Radiology, University of British Columbia, vancouver, BC, Canada, 8UBC MRI Research Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 9Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, vancouver, BC, Canada, 10Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 11School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Current treatment evaluation procedures of pain conditions are dependent on self-reported measures. The objective of this study was to determine changes in excitatory neurotransmitters (i.e., glutamate and glutamate+glutamine) in the anterior cingulate cortex as an objective measure of pain during a painful stimulus using single voxel functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (fMRS). Glutamate concentration changes during the painful stimulus suggest a role for glutamate in detecting pain which was not related to self-reported pain ratings. An exploratory analysis on sex revealed an 8.63% (p=0.08) increase in glutamate at pain onset in female participants compared with a 7.45% (p=0.31) increase in males.

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