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Abstract #1983

Subanesthetic ketamine infusion increases oxidative metabolism in human prefrontal cortex

Naomi R. Driesen1,2, Peter Herman3, Margaret Rowland1,2, Maolin Qiu3, George He4, Peter T. Morgan1, Andrea Diaz-Stansky1, Sarah Fineberg1, Daniel Barron1, Lars Helgeson5, Robert Chow5, Ralitza Gueorguieva6, Teo-Carlo Straun7, John H. Krystal1,2, and Fahmeed Hyder3,8
1Psychiatry, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States, 2VA Connecticut Health Care System, West Haven, CT, United States, 3Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States, 4Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States, 5Anesthesiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States, 6Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States, 7Straun Health and Wellness, New Haven, CT, United States, 8Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States

We compared the effect of subanesthetic infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine on metabolic activity to a similar volume of saline infusion in healthy volunteers. Since BOLD fMRI depends on neurovascular-neurometabolic couplings which can be confounded by pharmacological agents, we measured transverse relaxation rates (R2, R2*) and blood flow (CBF) to calculate oxidative metabolism (CMRO2) with calibrated fMRI. We found CBF and CMRO2 increased with ketamine infusion in nearly all Brodmann areas of the cortex. The CMRO2 increase was significant in prefrontal (0.16±0.06, p=0.026) and visual cortex (0.22±0.07, p=0.01), but not in sensorimotor cortex (0.17±0.14, p=0.258).

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