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Abstract #2585

Multi-parameter assessment of Perianal Crohn’s disease using quantitative MRI: A Multi-centre study.

Ali Alyami1,2,3, Caroline Hoad 2,4, Ross Little5, Konstantinos Argyriou4, Uday Bannur6, Khalid Latief6, Christopher Clarke6, Phillip Lung7, Michael Berks5, Susan Cheung5, James PB O'Connor5,8, Geoff JM Parker9,10, Penny Gowland2, and Gordon W. Moran1,4
1Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 2Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 3Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia, 4NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 5Quantitative Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Division of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, 6Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiology, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 7St Mark's Hospital and London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, Radiology, London, United Kingdom, 8Radiotherapy Related Research, Division of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, 9Bioxydyn Limited, Manchester, United Kingdom, 10Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London, United Kingdom

Perianal Crohn’s disease (pCD) is a potential complication of CD patients. Disease monitoring is imprecise due to unreliable clinical scores and subjective radiological reporting. Quantitative MRI sequences, e.g. diffusion-weighted image (DWI), dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE), magnetization transfer (MT) and T2 relaxometry offer opportunities to improve diagnostic capability. This study aimed to attain pilot data regarding the diagnostic utility of these sequences before and after 12 weeks of biological treatment in active pCD. Significant negative correlation was found between MTR and T2, MTR and DCE parameter ktrans and MTR with apparent diffusion coefficient, reflecting competing disease effects of inflammation and fibrosis.

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