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Abstract #2981

Reduced brain sodium and elevated cerebral blood flow in women with lipedema

Kalen J. Petersen1, Maria Garza1, Paula Donahue2, Kevin Harkins3, Manus Donahue1,4,5, and Rachelle Crescenzi1
1Radiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States, 2Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States, 3Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States, 4Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States, 5Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Cener, Nashville, TN, United States

Patients with the adipose disorder lipedema exhibit elevated sodium in the extremities, potentially due to blood or lymphatic vasculopathy. Despite evidence of psychological symptoms, these parameters have not been examined in the brain. We utilized multi-nuclear imaging (23Na-MRI) and arterial spin labeling to test whether dysregulation of brain sodium and perfusion is present in women with (n=15) versus without (n=18) lipedema. We observed lower brain sodium (61.3±6.9 vs. 67.9±5.8mmol/L; p=0.03) and higher cerebral blood flow (43.3±7.0 vs. 37.9±6.3ml blood/100mg tissue/min; p=0.03) in lipedema compared to control participants. Results suggest that brain sodium and hemodynamic dysregulation may exist in lipedema patients.

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