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Abstract #4608

Wide-spread Reduced Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Right Ventricle Compared to Left Ventricle Single Ventricle Heart DiseaseĀ 

Rajesh Kumar1,2,3,4, Bhaswati Roy1, Xingfeng Shao5, Nancy J. Halnon6, Alan B. Lewis7, Mary A. Woo8, Danny JJ Wang5,9, and Nancy A. Pike8
1Anesthesiology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 2Radiology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 3Bioengineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 4Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 5Neurology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 6Division of Pediatric Cardiology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 7Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 8UCLA School of Nursing, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 9Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Single ventricle heart disease (SVHD) presents with either a dominant single right ventricle (RV) or left ventricle (LV). Individuals with RV dominant SVHD show worse outcomes, including worse cognition and quality of life, which may result from decreased cardiac output due to differences in ventricular size, shape, and function or other structural related sequela, contributing to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes. We examined CBF changes between RV and LV over controls, and found more wide-spread changes in RV over LV. These findings indicate that worse outcomes in RV SVHD may result from compromised CBF over LV SVHD.

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