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Abstract #4667

Relationships between myelin development and neurodevelopmental outcomes in very preterm and typically developing children

Deanne K Thompson1,2,3,4, Joseph YM Yang2,3,5,6, Jian Chen2, Claire E Kelly1,2, Chris L Adamson2, Bonnie Alexander1,2, Lillian G Matthews7, Katherine J Lee1,3,8, Rod W Hunt1,3,9, Jeanie LY Cheong1,10,11, Megan Spencer-Smith1,12, Marc L Seal2,3, Terrie E Inder1,7, Lex W Doyle1,3,10,11, and Peter J Anderson1,12
1Victorian Infant Brain Studies, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia, 2Developmental Imaging, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia, 3Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia, 4Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, Australia, 5Neuroscience Research, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Parkville, Australia, 6Department of Neurosurgery, the Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Australia, 7Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States, 8Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics Unit, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Parkville, Australia, 9Neonatal Medicine, Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Australia, 10Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Australia, 11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia, 12Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia

Children born very preterm have altered myelination compared with full-term controls, but whether the T1-T2 ratio is a sensitive measure for understanding neurodevelopmental functioning remains unknown. This study found that the T1-T2 ratio trajectory between 7 and 13 years of age in the uncinate fasciculus was related to IQ scores, and 13-year T1-T2 ratios in almost all white matter regions were associated with motor functioning in both birth groups. Myelin development assessed using the T1-T2 ratio appears to be sensitive to predicting some neurodevelopmental outcomes.

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