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Abstract #0485

Disseminated brain pathology detected with high-resolution MRSI correlates with clinical disability in multiple sclerosis

Eva Heckova1, Alexandra Lipka1, Assunta Dal-Bianco2, Bernhard Strasser1, Gilbert Hangel1,3, Paulus Rommer2, Petra Hnilicov√°4, Ema Kantorov√°5, Lukas Hingerl1, Stanislav Motyka1, Fritz Leutmezer2, Stephan Gruber1, Siegfried Trattnig1,6, and Wolfgang Bogner1
1High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 2Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 4Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia, 5Clinic of Neurology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia, 6Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna, Austria

To enhance the detection of diffuse pathological alterations associated with multiple sclerosis, high-resolution MR spectroscopic imaging was performed at 7T, together with clinical MRI, in 68 MS patients with different levels of clinical disability and 20 healthy controls. Increased myo-inositol, a marker of neuroinflammation-induced astrogliosis, was found in white matter regions appearing normal on clinical MRI, even in subgroup of MS patients with no evidence of clinical disability. Myo-inositol/N-acetylaspartate ratio in the NAWM and cortical gray matter correlated with EDSS, suggesting that reactive astrogliosis and axonal injury play important role in the evolution of MS-related disability.

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