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Abstract #0698

Is [1-13C]Lactate Converted to 13C-Bicarbonate in the Human Brain?

Casey Y Lee1,2, Hany Soliman3, Nadia D Bragagnolo1,2, Albert P Chen4, William J Perks5, Chris Heyn6, Sandra E Black7, and Charles H Cunningham1,2
1Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, 2Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada, 3Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada, 4GE Healthcare Technologies, Toronto, ON, Canada, 5Pharmacy, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada, 6Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada, 7Department of Medicine (Neurology) and Hurvitz Brain Sciences Research Program, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada

Hyperpolarized [1-13C]lactate and 13C-bicarbonate images were acquired with and without spectral-spatial lactate saturation in the brains of control participants. A previously published atlas-based analysis was used to convert [1-13C]lactate and 13C-bicarbonate signals into z-scores to quantify the effect of [1-13C]lactate saturation. The analysis showed that lactate z-scores were changed in the saturation regions, as expected. The saturation of [1-13C]lactate signals did not significantly affect 13C-bicarbonate signals.

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