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Abstract #1539

Quantitative Assessment of Pathological Brain Changes in HIV using MP2RAGE

Antonio Jimenez Gonzalez*1,2,3, Mário João Fartaria*1,2,3, Pietro Maggi4, Tobias Kober1,2,3, Jean-Philippe Thiran2,3, Karl Egger5, Renaud Du Pasquier4, François Lazeyras6, Frédéric Assal7, Alexandra Calmy8, Matthias Cavassini9, and Cristina Granziera10,11
1Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Siemens Healthcare, Lausanne, Switzerland, 2Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, 3LTS5, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland, 4Departement of Neurology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, 5Department of Neuroradiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, 6Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, CIBM, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland, 7Cognitive Neurology Unit, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland, 8Division of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland, 9Department of Infectious Diseases, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, 10Neurologic Clinic and Policlinic, Departments of Medicine, Clinical Research and Biomedical Engineering, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, 11Translational Imaging in Neurology (ThINk) Basel, Department of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

The clinical landscape of HIV has evolved from a fatal disease to a manageable condition, giving rise to secondary complications associated with the chronic infection still present under treatment. HIV penetrates the brain very early after infection. Here, we investigated the mechanism behind structural brain changes observed in 92 aviremic HIV patients compared to 125 seronegative controls using quantitative MRI. Changes in cortical and subcortical structures and T1 relaxation times were observed. We thus speculate that the differential pattern in HIV patients reflects biological mechanisms underlying different stages of brain infection, namely acute inflammation and neuronal loss.

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