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Abstract #1540

Cerebral Blood Flow and Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Acute and Chronic HIV-Infection Treated by Combination Antiretroviral Therapies

Kyle Murray1, Md. Nasir Uddin2, Madalina Tivarus3, Arun Venkataraman1, Yuchuan Zhuang4, Xing Qiu5, Lu Wang5, Meera Singh6, Jianhui Zhong1,3, Sanjay Maggirwar7, and Giovanni Schifitto2,3
1Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Webster, NY, United States, 2Neurology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, United States, 3Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, United States, 4Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, United States, 5Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, United States, 6Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, United States, 7Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington DC, DC, United States

Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) maintains virologic control in HIV patients, but may lead to neurotoxicity. By using neuroimaging and cellular microparticle quantification, we explore the effects cART may have in both acute and chronic HIV-infection. We find that cART treatment does reduce microparticle levels associated with neuroinflammation to those of controls. Further, microparticle levels and neuroimaging results strengthen assumptions about immune dysfunction in HIV infection. We demonstrate that cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity can be used in conjunction with quantitative microparticle levels to study the effects of neuroinflammation and cART treatment in both acute and chronic HIV infection.

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