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Abstract #1676

Relationship between GluCEST concentration and Perivascular Spaces (glia-lymphatic waste clearance pathways) at 7T in Acute Ischemic Stroke

Benjamin Sinclair1,2, John-Paul Nicolo1,2,3,4, David Wright1, Bradford Moffat5, Andrew Neale1,2,3,4, Nian Yu6,7, Elaine Lui8,9, Patricia Desmond8,9, Rebecca Glarin8,9, Kathryn Davis10, Ravi Prakash Nanga11, Ravinder Reddy11, Farshid Sepehrband12, Bernard Yan3,4, Scott Kolbe1, Patrick Kwan1,2,3,4, Terence J O'Brien1,2,3,4, and Meng Law1,6
1Department of Neuroscience, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, 2Department of Neurology, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, 3Department of Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, 4Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, 5Melbourne Node of the National Imaging Facility, Department of Radiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, 6Department of Radiology, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, 7Department of Radiology, The Nanjing Brain Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China, 8Department of Radiology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, 9Department of Radiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, 10Penn Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 11Center for Magnetic Resonance & Optical Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 12USC Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

In this pilot study we test the hypothesis that glutamate levels post-stroke are influenced by glia-lymphatic clearance pathways in the brain. Excess glutamate can be neurotoxic, and stroke is associated with focally elevated gluatamate concentrations. Perivascular spaces have recently been found to play a role in waste clearance in the brain, and often become enlarged when compromised. We used Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging at 7T to characterise glutamate concentrations, and found that they were moderately positively correlated with scores of enlarged pervivascular spaces.

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