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Abstract #2708

Detecting Muscle Activity using a 0.5T Upright Open MRI – A Pilot Study Using a Double Echo Steady State Sequence to Measure T2 in Biceps and Triceps

Noor Shaikh1,2,3, Andrew Yung4, Honglin Zhang5, John Street2,6, Cornelia Laule2,7,8,9, Thomas Oxland2,3,6, and David Wilson2,5,6
1Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 2ICORD, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 3Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 4UBC MRI Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 5Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 6Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 7Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 8Physics & Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 9Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

We used a 0.5T upright open MRI to investigate T2 as a marker for muscle activity. Six volunteers’ arms were imaged with a Double Echo Steady State (DESS) sequence while relaxing (30min), following weighted bicep curls, and again after relaxing (20min). Directly after bicep curls T2 increased (average 41%) in the biceps but not the triceps, then subsequently decreased (average 14%) with relaxing. Intra-rater repeatability was promising. T2 standard deviation was relatively high, which is likely due to tissue heterogeneity. This preliminary study supports the potential of using DESS in upright open MRI to assess muscle injury or dysfunction.

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